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Startup's AR packaging 'wows' pharmaceuticals giant Bayer

Tue 5 Oct 2021

An Australian startup has created ‘holographic’ packaging that uses augmented reality (AR) to display an interactive virtual display and a holographic person.

Immertia was founded by Matt Hallberg, Luke Chaffey and Dave Chaffey. The company brings augmented reality, software development and digital marketing strategy together to create a virtual experience on every package.

The virtual experience begins when customers scan a label to activate the hologram through a smartphone’s camera. Augmented reality then provides animated packaging, a 3D product display, and interactive virtual buttons and scrolls.

Immertia managing director Dave Chaffey says the technology has ‘limitless’ potential to engage consumers, but there are barriers to the use of augmented reality.

“That means that many concepts are either one-off, not really matching consumer needs, or not scalable for widespread use. We’ve overcome those barriers and created some sensational solutions. We’re looking forward to bringing these concepts to the mainstream.”

The company has attracted interest from pharmaceutical company Bayer, as well as contracts for wine breweries Swig and Winerytale in the United States.

“We were surprised to get that call [from Bayer]. They’re a massive group - 100,000 people on the team. There’s only four of us,” says Chaffey.

Their creation for Bayer includes an interactive virtual display, including a holographic person inside the packaging. The hologram then provides information about the product, in English or Spanish.

Bayer’s global innovations team comments, “The technology [Immertia] is bringing to market is just phenomenal... We’ve shared the project with several markets and their feedback has simply been, wow, what do we do next?”

Immertia is also conducting a capital raise of US$1.8 million to continue its expansion. The company is seeking expressions of interest from investors for share issues of US$50,000 to US$1 million.

The company states on its website, “On the back of convenience, and trust, a new commerce channel will inevitably evolve, where consumers can scan a product to purchase a replacement product, a truly circular economy."

“It will be disruptive. And it will be great for some products, but not for others. Once technology reaches a stage where this is achievable, it will be inevitable. Because it is a shorter path to purchase."

"History teaches us that convenience is a powerful driver of change, and trust is a lean enabler. And at every point in the last hundred years, wherever a  shorter path to purchase has been created, it has been rewarded well.”
 

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